Rabbit vaccination & Neutering

Neutering rabbits makes them happier and healthier and enables them to live as bonded pairs or groups, meeting social needs without increasing rabbit population.

Your rabbit should be vaccinated routinely against Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) and Myxomatosis. Both these viral diseases can be rapidly fatal in an unvaccinated rabbit and there are no cures once infected. The only protection you can give your rabbit is by vaccination.

Vaccinating Pet Rabbits

Your rabbit should be vaccinated routinely against Rabbit Haemorrhagic Disease (RHD) and Myxomatosis. Both these viral diseases can be rapidly fatal in an unvaccinated rabbit and there are no cures once infected. The only protection you can give your rabbit is by vaccination.

Rabbit Haemorragic Disease

RHD is spread by direct contact between rabbits (both wild and domesticated) but also via indirect contact such as from people, clothing, on shoes, other objects, fleas and other parasites.

Myxomatosis

Myxomatosis is spread mainly by fleas or other biting insects and is transmitted in this way from wild to pet rabbits but can sometimes also spread via direct contact with other infected individuals. A combined Myxomatosis-RHD vaccination can be given from as early as 5 weeks of age. Boosters are given every 12 months and cover both diseases. Regular health checks for your rabbit

The best way of avoiding many medical problems in your pet rabbit is to have regular veterinary health checks. Your vet will do a full medical examination and check the teeth (particularly the back teeth) for any evidence of malocclusion which could lead to spikes and tongue ulceration. Rabbits with identified existing tooth problems should be checked at least every 6 to 8 weeks. A thorough dental check will require sedation.

Insuring Your Pet Rabbit

If your rabbit gets ill, the last thing you want to worry about is a vet bill. Insurance is now available for rabbits and if the worst happens and your rabbit does get sick, insurance means your vet can dedicate their effort into doing all that is necessary to diagnose and treat any illness, rather than worrying about doing certain tests or treatments because of the cost.

Neutering

Neutering rabbits makes them happier and healthier and enables them to live as bonded pairs or groups, meeting social needs without increasing rabbit population.

The aims of neutering:
• To remove reproductive organs so that the rabbit cannot reproduce.
• To decrease any unwanted behavior such as spraying urine, aggression, excessive mounting and false pregnancies.
• To eliminate the risk of reproductive cancers – the younger the rabbit is neutered, less than 6 months, the less chance there is that the rabbit will develop unwanted behaviours or uterine cancer.
What age can my rabbit be neutered from?
Rabbits can be neutered from 4 months of age.

Hormonal behaviours
Neutered rabbits still have hormones circulating throughout their body. During spring wild rabbits are at the peak breeding time and therefore have lots of hormones. Within domestic rabbits, social, sexual and even aggressive behaviours may surface but may be mild. During spring months and early summer it is a common occurrence for bonded pairs to have more disagreements mainly increased mounting and chasing. If fighting does break out then the rabbits may need separating, time to calm down and careful reintroductions. Ensure during spring you supply your rabbits’ natural enrichment to enable them to keep mentally and physically active, giving them ample time in the garden to dig, forage, skip and play.

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